Indusgeeks

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The recent uptick in gamification might have, more than you think, to do with keywords. The ill-defined, yet popular term has come to encompass serious games, screen and computer-based games, game elements, and a variety of permutations of the same. It’s popularity has fed a growing debate about it’s effectiveness. A body of research has evolved

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Nick Peller, a British game developer, first used the term gamification, in it’s current sense, back in 2004. Since then, a body of research has developed around gamified learning solutions to quantify it’s value in educational technology. This series will explore eye-opening research within gamification and contextualize it with emerging trends in the training industry. This research is built

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medical training simulations

Medicine X or MedX for short, is a collaboration of minds, ideas and technologies that will determine the future of healthcare and medical training. On April 22nd, 2017, Stanford University presented cutting-edge technologies emerging at the forefront of healthcare training, and presented both academic and corporate means to implement them in the medical practice. Sid Banerjee, CEO,

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In the current training landscape, new trends have now established themselves to be unparalleled when it comes to helping the user engage with content, improve learning (and driving an enthusiasm to learn) as well create better retention of learned material. These trends include serious games, game  based learning and gamification. Below is a brief look